The 90's Look

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The Bad Wedding Video. They parody themselves and we all know how to identify them. I’ve heard them described as a “90’s look” and not in a vintage kind of way. They may feature some shaky footage or less than stellar audio, courtesy of uncle Phil who volunteered to shoot the wedding with his brand new “high-end” camera but forgot to consider the microphone. Whatever the case, bad videos are pretty easily recognizable and sometimes one bad element, like a botched audio during speeches or a bad choice in background music can spoil the whole sequence, like how one bad ingredient can spoil a dish. An exceptional wedding video on the other hand is not so easily distinguished, and pinpointing the reason why a video is great as opposed to simply good, can be elusive and misunderstood. 

 

A wedding video is a product of the entire process, consisting of preproduction planning, shooting and editing. One single element, no matter how impressive on it’s own cannot turn a bad video into a great one by itself. No drone shot, soundtrack or filter/color treatment is the magical ingredient that can be repeated for every video. Some things, of course happen by chance like having the perfect camera set up for the ring bearer’s spur-of-the-moment dance during the speeches. There are, however certain efforts that go into a great wedding video that helps set itself apart from the “average” category. 

 

The pre-production stage for a wedding video often doesn’t find its way onto the package details. It is still a very critical stage for customizing the video to represent the couple’s taste in music and understanding things like sense of humor (may come into play during guest interviews). If there is a special pair of earrings that a bride’s mother gave to her daughter, a videographer should know about it prior to the shoot. Not only should he/she know about it, but the way it gets shot and edited is often determined weeks or even months in advance of the wedding day. How will the earrings be framed? How will they be connected to the mother? Will the bride mention it verbally on camera? Will it be a voice-over, perhaps? Maybe a split screen showing the mother on one side and the daughter on the other side with the earrings being the common object seen on both frames. All of these options are available to a professional video team and paying close attention to this type of detail in the pre-production process is critical for the finished product to be as perfect as possible.